News


Mar


2017

New Partner – Lukáš Michálik

In January 2017, Lukáš Michálik was promoted as partner of the law firm Hamala Kluch Víglaský, joining founding partners Roman Hamala, Martin Kluch and Peter Víglaský. Expansion of the pool of partners reflects the growth of the Firm’s business and its readiness for new challenges.
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HVK_Lukas_Michalik-2 smallLukáš Michálik joined the firm in 2006 as one of its first members. Since then, he has demonstrated remarkable personal and professional qualities that quickly turned him into a most valuable member of the Hamala Kluch Víglaský team.

The steady growth of the firm has required us to grow and re-shape the structure of our team. The expansion of our partnership pool sends a signal to the market that HKV is prepared for further growth and challenges.”  Roman Hamala, founding partner of Hamala Kluch Víglaský.

Lukáš Michálik obtained his law degree at Univerzita Karlova, Prague, Czech Republic before going on to receive his LL.M. degree and Business Law Certificate from University of California, Berkeley Law, one of the world’s best universities.

He has 10 years of experience and specializes in corporate law, M&A, banking & finance and real estate law. Throughout his practice, he has been involved in many complex cross-border transactions including some of the largest and most high-profile deals in the Slovak Republic. He is regularly involved in the legal and business structuring of clients’ deals upon their creation as well as during their execution and implementation.

The strength of our firm has always been in providing highly professional legal services, while preserving our flexible and solution-oriented approach that both our international and domestic clients value so much. Lukáš has grown with the firm and has helped to shape the future of our business. He is a strong lawyer with extraordinary business-sense, combined with impeccable personal and management skills. These assets make him a partner of our firm that we are lucky to have.” Roman Hamala


Aug


2016

Tax Avoidance

On 12 July 2016, the European Council adopted new directive laying down rules against tax avoidance practices that directly affect the functioning of the internal market of the European Union (the Directive). It is part of a package of European Commission proposals designed to strengthen rules against corporate tax avoidance based on OECD recommendations.
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The Directive addresses situations where corporations, mostly multinational groups, take advantage of disparities between national tax systems in order to reduce their tax payments. It responds to the perception of many taxpayers and small and medium-sized enterprises that some multinationals do not pay their fair share of tax, thereby distorting tax competition within the European Union´s single market. The Directive covers all taxpayers that are subject to corporate tax in member states, including subsidiaries of companies based in third countries. It contains anti-tax-avoidance rules for situations that may arise in the field of interest limitation rules, exit taxation rules, general anti-abuse rules, controlled foreign company rules (CFC) and rules for hybrid mismatches. The Directive will ensure that the OECD anti-BEPS (base erosion and profit shifting) measures are implemented in a coordinated manner in the European Union by which three of the five areas covered by the Directive implement OECD recommendations (the interest limitation rules, the CFC rules and the rules on hybrid mismatches). The member states will have until 31 December 2018 to transpose it into their national laws and regulations, except for the exit taxation rules, which must be transposed by 31 December 2019. Member states that have targeted rules that are as effective as the interest limitation rules may apply them until the OECD reaches an agreement on a minimum standard, or until 1 January 2024 at the latest.

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Jul


2016

Trade Secret Protection

On June 8, 2016, the European Parliament approved the Directive on the protection of undisclosed know-how and business information (trade secrets) against their unlawful acquisition, use or disclosure, ensuring progressive harmonization in the field of trade secrets and laying down common measures regarding the protection of trade secrets.
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Since Companies invest in acquiring, developing and applying know-how and information, such investments have an impact on their competitiveness and innovative performance in the market and therefore on the motivation to continue to innovate. However, there is great diversity of systems and definitions in member states regarding the treatment and protection of trade secrets. The new Directive 2016/943 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 8 June 2016 on the protection of undisclosed know-how and business information (trade secrets) against their unlawful acquisition, use or disclosure (the Directive), therefore aims at ensuring the smooth functioning of the internal market. The Directive shall bring legal clarity and help increase interest in the development of research and innovation activities. In accordance with the new legal framework, EU member states will have to ensure that trade secret holders are entitled to apply for measures, procedures and remedies provided for in the Directive in order to prevent or obtain redress for the unlawful acquisition, use or disclosure of their trade secrets. While the directive provides for measures preventing the disclosure of information to protect the confidentiality of trade secrets, the new measures fully ensure that investigative journalism may be pursued without any new limitations. The directive will not impose any restrictions on workers in their employment contracts where national law will continue to apply. There will be no limitation to an employee´s use of experience and skills honestly acquired in the normal course of their employment. Persons acting in good faith who reveal trade secrets for the purpose of protecting the general public interest, commonly known as ‘whistle-blowers’, will also enjoy appropriate protection.  According to the Directive, an application for measures and remedies must be dismissed where the alleged acquisition, use or disclosure of a trade secret was carried out in the act of exercising the right to freedom of expression and information, revealing misconduct, wrongdoing or illegal activity, provided that the respondent acted for the purpose of protecting the general public interest (whistle-blowing); in disclosure by workers to their representatives as part of their legitimate exercising of their functions in accordance with EU or national law, provided that such disclosure was necessary for such exercise; and for the purpose of protecting a legitimate interest recognized by EU or national law.

The Directive was published in the EU Official Journal on June 15, 2016. It will enter into force 20 days after its publication and member states will have a maximum of two years to incorporate the new provisions into domestic law.

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May


2016

New Public Procurement Act

The National Council of the Slovak Republic approved the all new Public Procurement Act replacing the existing regulation, which had been amended several times. The new Act is based on newly adopted directives of the European Union that comprehensively regulate the field of public procurement and respond to the trend of pervasive electronisation in public administration.
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On January 15, 2014, new European Union directives governing public procurement were approved by the European Parliament with a 24-month transposition period for member states (36 months for central procurement and 54 months for obligatory electronisation). The Slovak Republic fulfilled its transposition duty by the new Act effective from April 18, 2016. The main objectives of the new Act are to promote efficiency and generally speed up the procurement through mandatory electronisation, better flexibility, reduction of administrative difficulties, better access of SMEs to the market and the introduction of greater legal certainty. The new Act introduces new institutes such as a new procurement procedure called innovative partnership, in-house exceptions, direct payments to sub-contractors, joint procurement of contracting authorities, the introduction of legal grounds for withdrawal from contracts and the European Single Procurement Document for the manifestation of the fulfillment of conditions set for candidates during procurement.

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Apr


2016

Reform of EU privacy policy and data protection

On April 14, 2016, the European Parliament approved the reform of the privacy policy which is aimed at returning to internet users control over their data and ensuring a high and uniform level of protection corresponding to the digital age across the EU. The data protection reform package consists of two draft laws, a general Regulation covering the bulk of personal data processing in the EU and a Directive on processing data to prevent, investigate, detect and prosecute criminal offences and enforce criminal penalties.
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The new Regulation shall ensure that citizens have more control over their private information. It will introduce the right to be “forgotten” and thus the deletion of personal data by the service provider, conditions for the expression of consent to the processing of private data which must be provided and expressed clearly and which must allow the concerned person to revoke such consent, the right to transfer personal data to another service provider, and the right to know about the violation of protected personal data and privacy protection policies which must be presented to the customer in a clear and understandable form. The new Regulation also strengthens the enforcement of rules and sanctions which may reach up to 4% of the total global annual turnover of the relevant company for the previous fiscal year.

The new Directive on data transfers for police and judicial use concerns the cross-border transfer of data within the EU and lays down minimum standards for the processing and exchange of data by police and judicial authorities in each member state.

The Regulation will enter into force 20 days after its publication in the EU Official Journal. Its provisions will be directly applicable in all member states two years after this date. Member states will have two years to transpose the provisions of the Directive into national law.

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Mar


2016

Investment funds with variable registered capital

The National Council of the Slovak Republic approved an amendment of the Collective Investment Act and Commercial Code introducing investment fund organized as an investment company with variable registered capital.
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The amendment introduces new type of investment fund – SICAV (from French: Société d’Investissement à Capital Variable). The new type of investment fund will be organized as a separate legal entity in new legal form of a joint stock company with variable registered capital and will be established independently from a management company. The amendment requires SICAV to register only the minimum capital with the commercial register (at least EUR 125.000) and not the actual capital of the fund raised by shares and thus providing flexibility in issuing new shares. The amendment is effective from March 18, 2016.

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Feb


2016

Simple joint stock company & shareholders’ agreements

The National Council of the Slovak Republic approved an amendment of the Commercial Code introducing simple joint stock company and finally officially introduces widely-used shareholders’ agreements into the Slovak legislation including legislation about tag-along, drag-along or shootout rights between shareholders.
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The amendment introduces new type of company – simple joint stock company (j.s.a.). This type of company will combine certain features of limited liability company and joint stock company. The capital of j.s.a. will be divided into a number of shares with a certain nominal value with the minimum capital at least EUR 1. j.s.a. will be liable for its obligation with all its assets. Combination of features of other company types will create suitable solution particularly for investments into startups. The amendment also expressly introduces possibility for shareholders to enter into shareholders’ agreements that have been until now widely-used without specific legislation in place. The amendment also specifically introduces known mechanisms of tag-along, drag-along or shootout rights. Such rights will be for the first time expressly stated in Commercial code and, moreover, the Amendment establishes possibility to register rights in question in public registers specifically conducted for such purpose by Central Securities Depositary of the Slovak Republic. The amendment will be effective from January 1, 2017.
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Sep


2015

Criminal liability of legal entities

The Government of the Slovak Republic approved a new bill proposal introducing direct criminal liability of legal entities into Slovak law.
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The proposal significantly changes the current legal doctrine which recognizes only indirect criminal liability of legal entities. The bill contains an exhaustive list of criminal offences which might be committed by a legal entity, e.g. human trafficking, tax evasion, forgery, or unauthorized handling of waste. The crime would be committed by the legal entity if it were committed by its statutory body or an employee on behalf or in the interest of the legal entity. The criminally liable legal entity might be sentenced to a monetary fine, forfeiture of property, ban on business activities, or even to be winded up.
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May


2015

Amendment of the Bankruptcy and Restructuring Act

New amendment of the Bankruptcy and Restructuring Act has been adopted introducing essential changes to the restructuring process. read more

The amendment which has partially come into force as of 29 April 2015 significantly changed the restructuring process in the Slovak Republic. The amendment derogated the “principle of clean slate” which meant the obligations and debts not satisfied in the restructuring process ceased to exist upon its conclusion. Under the new wording of the Bankruptcy and Restructuring Act the obligations not satisfied in the restructuring process survive to certain extend the restructuring process and might be enforced after its conclusion. Please contact us for more information


Dec


2014

Forbes Business Leaders Club: Business Acquisitions – 10 December 2014

Martin Kluch, partner of our firm will be one of the key speakers at the annual Forbes Business Leades Club with topic Business Acquisitions. read more

The event will take place on 10 December 2014. For more information click here http://forbes.sk/show/article/131
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